Published on 17 Jun 2019

The Rise of Co-Working Continues




The number of people using co-working space in the UK rose 10% in the past year, according to a survey by blockchain-powered shared workspace provider Primalbase.This spring, the UK’s co-working population totalled 1.3 million, with 709,000 people using a co-working desk every day, the online survey of 4,000 co-working users found.“I think we’re seeing a fundamental shift in how people work,” says Primalbase chief executive Ralph Manheim. “For businesses, it is often cheaper and more convenient to move to a co-working space. They can easily scale up or down based on their staffing needs.”The largest share of those using co-working space are academics and students, who make up 29% of the user base. “Initially, we found this figure surprising,” says Manheim. “However, when we thought about it a bit more it made perfect sense. [Academics] are very keen to learn from entrepreneurs and [software] developers, and in many instances they are considering how they can turn their research into a new product or business.”After cost-effectiveness, collaboration was named as the second most important reason for respondents to use co-working space.The survey also offers clues as to how co-working providers can improve their centres. Lack of privacy was cited by 47% of respondents as the biggest drawback to co-working, with 37% saying the amount of noise was also an issue.Those providers looking to improve their centres should consider “everything from the layout to the materials that dampen and direct sound, or even colours that provoke a particular emotion”, says Manheim. Future demand for co-working space will be driven by a deep “human need to socialise” and collaborate with others, according to Manheim.

The number of people using co-working space in the UK rose 10% in the past year, according to a survey by blockchain-powered shared workspace provider Primalbase.

This spring, the UK’s co-working population totalled 1.3 million, with 709,000 people using a co-working desk every day, the online survey of 4,000 co-working users found.

“I think we’re seeing a fundamental shift in how people work,” says Primalbase chief executive Ralph Manheim. “For businesses, it is often cheaper and more convenient to move to a co-working space. They can easily scale up or down based on their staffing needs.”

The largest share of those using co-working space are academics and students, who make up 29% of the user base. “Initially, we found this figure surprising,” says Manheim. “However, when we thought about it a bit more it made perfect sense. [Academics] are very keen to learn from entrepreneurs and [software] developers, and in many instances they are considering how they can turn their research into a new product or business.”

After cost-effectiveness, collaboration was named as the second most important reason for respondents to use co-working space.

The survey also offers clues as to how co-working providers can improve their centres. Lack of privacy was cited by 47% of respondents as the biggest drawback to co-working, with 37% saying the amount of noise was also an issue.

Those providers looking to improve their centres should consider “everything from the layout to the materials that dampen and direct sound, or even colours that provoke a particular emotion”, says Manheim.